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English Language Arts IV – British Literature

  • Date created

    March 13, 2019

  • Last updated

    March 13, 2019

COURSE OVERVIEW

In English Language Arts IV – British Literature, students will engage in close-textual interaction with literature to heighten appreciation for those texts, improved critical and analytical skills in reading and writing, enhanced speaking and listening abilities, and enriched students’ academic and personal vocabulary. This course is organized chronologically, so students can see the influences on and evolution of the ideas and forms. Writing, research, and speaking assignments will continue to focus on formulating and expressing ideas and arguments about the readings. Emphasis is placed on gaining critical perspective on the relationship between content and form and on synthesizing ideas into clear and concise prose and presentations. To become critical consumers of text, students will be exposed to increasingly more complex texts to which they apply those skills.

  • Unit 1: Framing Western Literature: Students will explore selected works of medieval literature and philosophy, closely examining the narrative structure and literary elements such as allegory and satire, noting the way in which these elements reflect social and philosophical views; projects will engage skills such as the participation in academic group discussion and the construction of a literary character study.
  • Unit 2: Humanism: Students will explore selected philosophical and literary works of the Renaissance, comparing the works of this period with those of the Middle Ages, looking at their differences and similarities; projects will engage skills such as argumentation, research, and presentation.
  • Unit 3: The Quest for Knowledge: Students will examine the philosophical and literary writings of the late seventeenth and eighteenth century, focusing their emphasis on reform, reason, and science; special attention will be paid to the literary form known as satire and what it reveals about the author’s purpose. Students will also think critically about media and its influence on public opinion.
  • Unit 5: Head and Heart: Students will explore the literature and philosophy of the early nineteenth century and the emphasis on emotion in early romantic works, such as Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility; projects will engage skills such as speaking and listening, comparative analysis, and writing and revising an original narrative.
  • Unit 6: The Individual and Society: Students will focus on works and authors concerned with the place of the individual in society during the nineteenth century, including important philosophical works of the period, writing literary analysis essays and constructing and delivering a persuasive speech.
  • Unit 7: The Search for Meaning: Students will explore works in which authors confront questions about the nature of existence, the meaning of life, the human psyche, and alienation, with the unit culminating in a multimedia research project which presents and evaluates different critical perspectives of a work of the student’s choice. To end the course, students will analyze the intent of media and critically analyze multiple media sources.

CURRICULUM CONTENT AND SKILL FOCUS

Unit 1: Framing Western Literature

  • Refining reading skills: summary, annotation, analysis, evaluation, and interpretation
  • Identifying explicit and implicit meaning in European literature and philosophy
  • Analyzing a text from multiple perspectives (historical, literary, psychological, religious, philosophical)
  • Comparing and contrasting the treatment of a similar theme or topic in two or more works
  • Analyzing literary elements: narrative/poetic/dramatic structure, point of view, theme, allegory, satire, character
  • Analyzing language: figurative language, tone, syntax, connotation, nuance, power, beauty
  • Analyzing informational/philosophical texts: central ideas, key terms, interaction of ideas, point of view, purpose
  • Analyzing arguments: rhetoric, claim development, structure, purpose
  • Refining writing skills –
    • explanatory: responding to literature
    • argumentative: making a claim, supporting a claim, using valid reasoning, sequencing ideas, adapting to purpose, audience and task, using precise, domain-specific language, using the writing process
  • Refining research skills: web searches, challenging usage and vocabulary, evaluating credibility, reliability, validity,
  • Participating in speaking and listening activities: listening to and analyzing speeches, evaluating a speaker’s point of view and reasoning, collaborating with peers, addressing alternate or opposing views in discussions, structuring ideas to be presented appropriate to audience and purpose, adapting speech to audience and purpose, speaking clearly in formal tone, using correct grammar and vocabulary
  • Strengthening language skills: conventions, knowledge, vocabulary acquisition and use

Unit 2: Humanism

  • Refining reading skills: summary, paraphrase, annotation, analysis, evaluation, and interpretation
  • Identifying explicit and implicit meaning in European literature and philosophy
  • Analyzing a text from multiple perspectives (historical, literary, psychological, religious, philosophical)
  • Analyze different presentations and/or interpretations of a text
  • Compare and contrast the treatment of a similar theme or topic in two or more works
  • Analyzing literary elements: narrative/poetic/dramatic structure, point of view, theme, allegory, satire, character
  • Analyzing language: figurative language, technical language, tone, syntax, connotation, nuance, power, beauty
  • Analyzing informational/philosophical texts: central ideas, key terms, interaction of ideas, point of view, purpose
  • Analyzing and evaluating arguments: rhetoric, claim development, structure, purpose
  • Refining writing skills –
    • explanatory: responding to literature, synthesizing information, developing a thesis, supporting a thesis, organizing complex ideas, using appropriate and varied transitions between ideas, writing artful sentences, using precise, domain-specific, college-ready language
  • Refining research skills: web searches, challenging usage and vocabulary, gathering information representing a variety of perspectives, integrating material selectively and appropriately, making informed decisions and solving complex problems, distinguishing between quoted material and paraphrased ideas, using correct MLA guidelines for formatting, citing sources within a text, and creating a works cited page, using digital media elements such as graphics, illustrations, sound, and interactive elements
  • Participating in speaking and listening activities: listening to and analyzing speeches, evaluating a speaker’s point of view and reasoning, collaborating with peers, addressing alternate or opposing views in discussions, structuring ideas to be presented appropriate to audience and purpose, adapting speech to audience and purpose, speaking clearly in formal tone, using correct grammar and vocabulary
  • Strengthening language skills: conventions, knowledge, vocabulary acquisition and use

Unit 3: The Quest for Knowledge

  • Refining reading skills: summary, paraphrase, annotation, analysis, evaluation, and interpretation
  • Identifying explicit and implicit meaning in European literature and philosophy
  • Analyzing a text from multiple perspectives (historical, literary, psychological, religious, philosophical)
  • Analyze different presentations and/or interpretations of a text
  • Compare and contrast the treatment of a similar theme or topic in two or more works
  • Analyzing literary elements: narrative/poetic/dramatic structure, point of view, theme, character, allegory, satire, irony, sarcasm, understatement, character
  • Analyzing language: figurative language, technical language, tone, syntax, connotation, nuance, power, beauty
  • Analyzing informational/philosophical texts: central ideas, key terms, interaction of ideas, point of view, purpose
  • Analyzing and evaluating arguments: rhetoric, claim development, structure, purpose
  • Refining writing skills –
    • explanatory: responding to literature, compare/contrast, synthesizing information, developing a thesis, supporting a thesis, organizing complex ideas, using appropriate and varied transitions between ideas, writing artful sentences, using precise, domain-specific, college-ready language, using the writing process
    •  argumentative: making a claim, supporting a claim, using valid reasoning, sequencing ideas, integrating information from collaboration, adapting to purpose, audience and task, and creating a works cited page, focusing on clarity and precision of expression, using the writing process
  • Refining research skills: web searches, challenging usage and vocabulary, evaluating sources, integrating material selectively and appropriately, making informed decisions and solving complex problems, distinguishing between quoted material and paraphrased ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any source, using correct MLA guidelines for formatting, citing sources within a text, and creating a works cited page, using digital media elements such as graphics, illustrations, sound, and interactive elements
  • Participating in speaking and listening activities: listening to and analyzing speeches, evaluating a speaker’s point of view and reasoning, collaborating with peers, addressing alternate or opposing views in discussions
  • Strengthening language skills: conventions, knowledge, vocabulary acquisition and use
  • Analyze examples of media messages and their effect on public opinion

Unit 5: Head and Heart

  • Refining reading skills: summary, paraphrase, annotation, analysis, evaluation, and interpretation
  • Identifying explicit and implicit meaning in European literature and philosophy
  • Analyzing a text from multiple perspectives (historical, literary, psychological, religious, philosophical)
  • Compare and contrast the treatment of a similar theme or topic in two or more works
  • Analyzing literary elements: narrative/poetic/dramatic structure, point of view, theme, character, allegory, satire, irony, sarcasm, understatement, character
  • Analyzing language: figurative language, technical language, tone, syntax, connotation, nuance, power, beauty
  • Analyzing and evaluating informational/philosophical texts: central ideas, key terms, interaction of ideas, point of view, purpose
  • Refining writing skills –
    • explanatory: responding to literature, synthesizing information, developing a thesis, supporting a thesis, organizing complex ideas, using appropriate and varied transitions between ideas, writing artful sentences, using precise, domain-specific, college-ready language, using the writing process
    • narrative: mimicking literary technique
  • Refining research skills: web searches, challenging usage and vocabulary, evaluating sources, integrating material selectively and appropriately, making informed decisions and solving complex problems,
  • Participating in speaking and listening activities: listening to and analyzing speeches, evaluating a speaker’s point of view and reasoning, collaborating with peers, addressing alternate or opposing views in discussions
  • Strengthening language skills: conventions, knowledge, vocabulary acquisition and use

Unit 6: The Individual and Society

  • Refining reading skills: summary, paraphrase, annotation, analysis, evaluation, and interpretation
  • Identifying explicit and implicit meaning in European literature and philosophy
  • Analyzing a text from multiple perspectives (historical, literary, psychological, religious, philosophical)
  • Compare and contrast the treatment of a similar theme or topic in two or more works
  • Analyzing literary elements: narrative/poetic/dramatic structure, point of view, theme, character, conflict, irony, sarcasm, character
  • Analyzing language: figurative language, technical language, tone, syntax, connotation, nuance, power, beauty
  • Analyzing and evaluating informational/philosophical texts: central ideas, key terms, interaction of ideas, point of view, purpose, rhetoric
  • Refining writing skills –
    • explanatory: responding to literature, conveying complex ideas clearly and accurately, developing a thesis, supporting a thesis, organizing complex ideas, using appropriate and varied transitions between ideas, distinguish between quoted material and paraphrased ideas, formatting quotations and works cited according to MLA guidelines, writing artful sentences, using precise, domain-specific, college-ready language, using the writing process
  • Refining research skills: web searches, challenging usage and vocabulary, evaluating sources, integrating material selectively and appropriately, distinguishing between quoted material and paraphrased ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any source, using correct MLA guidelines for formatting, citing sources within a text, and creating a works cited page,
  • Participating in speaking and listening activities: listening to and analyzing speeches, creating presentations for evaluation; evaluating a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, evidence, diction, tone, rhetorical strategies; collaborating with peers, expressing ideas clearly and persuasively in collaborative contexts
  • Strengthening language skills: conventions, knowledge, vocabulary acquisition and use

Unit 7: The Search for Meaning

  • Refining reading skills: summary, paraphrase, annotation, analysis, evaluation, and interpretation
  • Identifying explicit and implicit meaning in European literature and philosophy
  • Analyzing a text from multiple perspectives (historical, literary, psychological, religious, philosophical)
  • Analyzing and evaluating different presentations and/or interpretations of a text
  • Analyzing literary elements: narrative dramatic structure, point of view, theme, character, conflict, irony, sarcasm, character
  • Analyzing language: figurative language, technical language, tone, syntax, connotation, nuance, power, beauty
  • Analyzing and evaluating informational/philosophical texts: central ideas, key terms, interaction of ideas, point of view, purpose, rhetoric, narrative digressions, idiosyncrasies, exaggerations, and biases
  • Refining writing skills –
    • explanatory: responding to literature, relating a literary work to a philosophical work, conveying complex ideas clearly and accurately, developing writing topic thoroughly using a variety of effective supporting content, using appropriate and varied syntax and transitions, adapting writing content to task, purpose, and audience, using appropriate transitions and syntax to link ideas, establishing and maintain a formal and objective tone in expository writing, providing a conclusion that follows from and supports information presented, using writing process to develop and strengthen writing for purpose and audience, using technology to create, edit, and publish individual writing or shared writing projects, using college and career readiness level academic vocabulary in reading, writing, and speaking, varying sentence structure and syntax to convey a certain style or tone and to enhance reader understanding
  • Refining research skills: challenging usage and vocabulary, evaluating sources, integrating material selectively and appropriately, distinguishing between quoted material and paraphrased ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any source, using correct MLA guidelines for formatting, citing sources within a text, and creating a works cited page,
  • Participating in speaking and listening activities: collaborating with peers about complex topics
  • Strengthening language skills: conventions, knowledge, vocabulary acquisition and use
  • Interact critically with multiple media sources

Literature List

The following are literary works students will encounter in English Language Arts IV – British Literature:

Unit 1: Framing Western Literature

  • Chesterton, G.K.
    • “The Permanent Philosophy” from St. Thomas Aquinas Chapter VII
  • Alighieri, Dante
    • Dante’s Inferno from The Divine Comedy
  • Boccaccio, Giovanni
    • The Decameron
      •  Introduction
      • The Tenth Day
  • Chaucer, Geoffrey
    • The Canterbury Tales

Unit 2: Humanism

  • Petrarch, Francesco
    • Sonnet “292”
  • Machiavelli, Niccolo
    • “Princely Virtues” from The Prince
  • Shakespeare, William
    • Sonnets “130” and “138”
    • Hamlet
  • Marlowe, Christopher
    •  “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love”
  •  Raleigh, Walter
    • The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd”
  • Herrick, Robert
    • “To the Virgins, to make much of Time”
  • Marvell, Andrew
    •  “To His Coy Mistress”
  • Donne, John
    • Sonnet “14”: “Batter My Heart” 

Unit 3: The Quest for Knowledge

  •  Marlowe, Christopher
    •  The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus
  • Descartes, Rene
    •  “I Think, Therefore I Am” from Discourse on Method
  • Locke, John
    • “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding”
  • Pope, Alexander
    • The Rape of the Lock”
  • Swift, Jonathan
    •  “A Modest Proposal”

Unit 5: Head and Heart

  • Austen, Jane
    • Sense and Sensibility
  • Blake, William
    • “The Tyger”
    • “The Lamb”
  • Wordsworth, William
    • “Preface” to Lyrical Ballads
    • “She Dwelt Among the Untrodden Ways”
  • Cooleridge, Samuel Taylor
    •  “Kubla Khan”
  • Lord Byron
    • “She Walks in Beauty”
  • Shelley, Percy Bysshe
    • “Ode to the West Wind”
  •  Keats, John
    •  “When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be”

Unit 6: The Individual and Society

  • Lord Tennyson
    • “The Lady of Shallot”
  • Woolf, Virginia
    • “The Continuing Appeal of Jane Eyre”
  •  Bronte, Charlotte
    • Jane Eyre
  • Darwin, Charles
    • On the Origin of the Species
  • James, Henry
    • Daisy Miller: A Study
  • Ibsen, Henrik
    • Hedda Gabler

Unit 7: The Search for Meaning

  • Chesterton, G.K.
    •  “The Fallacy of Success”
  • Valery, Paul
    • “The Crisis of the Mind”
  • Joyce, James
    •  “Araby” from Dubliners
  •  Sartre, Juan Paul
    • o “Existentialism”
  • Kafka, Franz
    • o “The Metamorphosis”
  • Camus, Albert
    • The Stranger

Additional Resources

Below is a list of resources that are not included in this course and must be acquired separately. In addition to the default course content, some projects may require paper and pencil or drawing supplies to complete the assignment. Writing assignments may require a graphic organizer to be printed out and used in the writing process. Projects (such as book reports or informational essays) may require students to acquire outside resources for research or reading.

 

Unit Assignment Resource
7 Required Unit Reading • The Stranger, Albert Camus. translated by Matthew Ward, ISBN: 978-0-679-72020-1

 

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